CATCHING PACKET DROPPERS AND MODIFIERS IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS PDF

Once compromising one attacks that can be launched by an adversary to disrupt or multiple detector nodes, AN opponent could lunch varied communication in wireless multihop sensor networks. In a attacks to disrupt the in-network communication. This paper wireless sensor network, sensor nodes monitor the deals with 2 common attacks, dropping packets and environment, detect events of interest, produce data, and modifying packets which might be launched by collaborate in forwarding the data toward a sink, which could be a gateway, base station, storage node, or querying user. Existing answer for detection packet Because of the ease of deployment, the low cost of sensor nodes dropping in Wireless detector Networks is multi path and the capability of self-organization, a sensor network is forwarding, during which every packet is forwarded on often deployed in an unattended and hostile environment to multiple redundant methods and therefore packet dropping in perform the monitoring and data collection tasks.

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Each sensor node generates sensory data periodically and all these nodes collaborate to forward packets containing the data toward a sink.

The sink is located within the network. We assume all sensor nodes and the sink are loosely time synchronized DAG Establishment In the initialization phase, sensor nodes form a topology which is a directed acyclic graph DAG. A routing tree is extracted from the DAG. Data reports follow the routing tree structure. The sink knows the DAG and the routing tree, and shares a unique key with each node. When a node wants to send out a packet, it attaches to the packet a sequence number, encrypts the packet only with the key shared with the sink, and then forwards the packet to its parent on the routing tree.

When an innocent intermediate node receives a packet, it attaches a few bits to the packet to mark the forwarding path of the packet, encrypts the packet, and then forwards the packet to its parent. On the contrary, a misbehaving intermediate node may drop a packet it receives.

On receiving a packet, the sink decrypts it, and thus finds out the original sender and the packet sequence number. The sink tracks the sequence numbers of received packets for every node, and for every certain time interval, which we call a round, it calculates the packet dropping ratio for every node. Based on the dropping ratio and the knowledge of the topology, the sink identifies packet droppers based on rules we derive. Packet Sending and Forwarding In each round, data are transferred through the routing tree to the sink.

When one round finishes, based on the extra bits carried in the received packets, the sink runs a node categorization algorithm to identify nodes that must be bad i. Packet Receiving at the Sink The routing tree is reshaped every round.

As a certain number of rounds have passed, the sink will have collected information about node behaviors in different routing topologies. To further identify bad nodes from the potentially large number of suspiciously bad nodes, the sink runs heuristic ranking algorithms.

Identifying Most Likely Bad Nodes from Suspiciously Bad Nodes We rank the suspiciously bad nodes based on their probabilities of being bad, and identify part of them as most likely bad nodes.

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