EL HAVAMAL PDF

The fool thinks that those who laugh At him are all his friends: When he comes to the Thing and calls for support, Few spokesmen he finds The fool who fancies he is full of wisdom While he sits by his hearth at home. Quickly finds when questioned by others. That he knows nothing at all. The ignorant booby had best be silent When he moves among other men, No one will know what a nit-wit he is Until he begins to talk; No one knows less what a nit-wit he is Than the man who talks too much.

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The fool thinks that those who laugh At him are all his friends: When he comes to the Thing and calls for support, Few spokesmen he finds The fool who fancies he is full of wisdom While he sits by his hearth at home. Quickly finds when questioned by others. That he knows nothing at all. The ignorant booby had best be silent When he moves among other men, No one will know what a nit-wit he is Until he begins to talk; No one knows less what a nit-wit he is Than the man who talks too much.

Wise is he not who is never silent, Mouthing meaningless words: A glib tongue that goes on chattering Sings to its own harm. A man among friends should not mock another: Many believe the man Who is not questioned to know much And so he escapes their scorn.

An early meal a man should take Before he visits friends, Lest, when he gets there, he go hungry, Afraid to ask for food. The fastest friends may fall out When they sit at the banquet-board: It is, and shall be, a shameful thing When guest quarrels with guest, The wise guest has his way of dealing With those who taunt him at table: He smiles through the meal, not seeming to hear The twaddle talked by his foes.

The tactful guest will take his leave Early, not linger long: He starts to stink who outstays his welcome In a hall that is not his own. A wayfarer should not walk unarmed, But have his weapons to hand: He knows not when he may need a spear, Or what menace meet on the road. No man is so generous he will jib at accepting A gift in return for a gift, No man so rich that it really gives him Pain to be repaid. Once he has won wealth enough, A man should not crave for more: What he saves for friends, foes may take; Hopes are often liars.

With presents friends should please each other, With a shield or a costly coat: Mutual giving makes for friendship, So long as life goes well, A man should be loyal through life to friends, To them and to friends of theirs, But never shall a man make offer Of friendship to his foes. A man should be loyal through life to friends, And return gift for gift, Laugh when they laugh, A false foe who lies.

If you find a friend you fully trust And wish for his good-will, exchange thoughts, Go often to his house. Even with one you ill-trust And doubt what he means to do, False words with fair smiles May get you the gift you desire.

To a false friend the footpath winds Though his house be on the highway. To a sure friend there is a short cut, Though he live a long way off. Hotter than fire among false hearts burns Friendship for five days, But suddenly slackens when the sixth dawns: Feeble their friendship then. The generous and bold have the best lives, Are seldom beset by cares, , But the base man sees bogies everywhere And the miser pines for presents.

The young fir that falls and rots Having neither needles nor bark, So is the fate of the friendless man: Why should he live long? Little a sand-grain, little a dew drop, Little the minds of men: A11 men are not equal in wisdom, The half-wise are everywhere It is best for man to be middle-wise, Not over cunning and clever: The fairest life is led by those Who are deft at all they do.

It is best for man to be middle-wise, Not over cunning and clever: No man is able to know his future, So let him sleep in peace. It is best for man to be middle-wise, Not over cunning and clever: The learned man whose lore is deep Is seldom happy at heart.

Brand kindles brand till they burn out, Flame is quickened by flame: One man from another is known by his speech The simpleton by his silence. Early shall he rise who has designs On anothers land or life: His prey escapes the prone wolf, The sleeper is seldom victorious. Early shall he rise who rules few servants, And set to work at once: Much is lost by the late sleeper, Wealth is won by the swift, A man should know how many logs And strips of bark from the birch To stock in autumn, that he may have enough Wood for his winter fires.

As the eagle who comes to the ocean shore, Sniffs and hangs her head, Dumfounded is he who finds at the Thing No supporters to plead his case. It is safe to tell a secret to one, Risky to tell it to two, To tell it to three is thoughtless folly, Everyone else will know. Moderate at council should a man be, Not brutal and over bearing: Among the bold the bully will find Others as bold as he. These things are thought the best: Fire, the sight of the sun, Good health with the gift to keep it, And a life that avoids vice.

Not all sick men are utterly wretched: Some are blessed with sons, Some with friends,.

ECE SUPERBOOK PDF

El Hávamál

There will be more introductory material as time permits. Lines in italics in the text and translation are repeated from earlier verses. Verses are a long harangue to Loddfafnir, and most of them begin with a refrain of four lines telling Loddfafnir that it would be better if he took the advice: this refrain is italicized on second and subsequent occurrences to make it easier to skip to the new material in each verse. Notes on the translation: The translation starts out from a literal translation I made while studying Old Norse at Cambridge, but I have been changing it in two directions since. Firstly, I have made some changes from a literal translation to one that "sounds better", i. For instance, line

CSA C282 PDF

Once things felt right, I approached the ink blobs, and with the text in mind began to find shapes and forms within the randomness. It deceives the heart of the wise. Gunnloth gave to me [3] a drink of the precious mead [2] on her golden throne; A bad reward I gave her afterwards for her whole heart, for her sorrowful spirit. He is knowing in commonsense. The unwise man thinks he knows everything if he has refuge for himself in a corner. Thanks to Serge Boffa for this suggestion. Learn more about accountability.

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