HENRY PEACHAM THE GARDEN OF ELOQUENCE PDF

Current location in this text. Enter a Perseus citation to go to another section or work. Full search options are on the right side and top of the page. Diacope is a figure which repeateth a word putting but one word betweene, or at least verie few.

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Current location in this text. Enter a Perseus citation to go to another section or work. Full search options are on the right side and top of the page. Epanaphora, or Anaphora, is a forme of speech which beginneth diverse members, still with one and the same word. First in long periods. An example of Cicero in the praises of Pompey: A witnesse is Italie, which Lucius Cilla being bictor confessed, was by the vertue and counsell of this man delivered: A witnesse is Celicia, which being environed on every side with many and great dangers, he set at libertie, not with terror of warre, but quicknesse of counsel: A witnesse is Africa, which being opprest with great armies of enemies, flowed with the blood of slaine men: A witnesse is France, through which a way was made with great slaughter of Frenchmen for our armies into Spaine: A witnesse is Spaine, which hath very often seene, that by this man many enemies have ben overcome and vanquished.

The Lord remaineth a king for ever. The Lord shall give strength unto his people. The Lord shall give his people the blessing of peace. By Comaes. Where is ye Scribe? Where is the disputer of this world? By a double Epanaphora in an Antithesis, thus, The covetous man is ever poore. The contented man is alwayes rich. The covetous man is an enemie to him selfe.

The contented man is a friend to others. The covetous man is full of care. The contented man is full of comfort. By a certaine increase in the clauses following, thus, I desire you for the love I have borne to you, for the love you have borne to me, and for the love which our good God doth beare to us all, that you will remember these my last words, uttered with my last breath.

The use of this figure. To repate a word of importance. The use hereof is chiefly to repeate a word of importance, and effectuall signification, as to repeate the cause before his singular effects, or contrariwise the effect before his severall causes, 2. To delight the eare. It serveth also pleasantly to the eare, both in the respects of the repetition, and also of the varietie of the new clause.

The Caution. Although this figure be an exornation of great use, yet it may be too often used in an oration. Secondly ye repetitions ought not to be many, I meane the word ought not to be repeated too oft, as some do use it, in a most wearisome Tautalogie.

Thirdly heede ought to be taken, that the word which is least worthie or most weake, be not taken to make the repetition, for that were very absurd.

The Garden of Eloquence Henry Peachum. Delmar, New York This text was converted to electronic form by professional data entry and has been proofread to a medium level of accuracy. An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

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The Garden of Eloquence

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Henry Peacham

Balkree Lists What are lists? Yet the English peachan endevoreth what it can to speake by this part, as where it saith, I can not court it, I can not Italian it, that is, I can not performe the dutie or manners of a courtier, I can not imitate the fashion of an Italian. Login to add to list. You also may like to try some of these bookshopswhich may or may not sell this item. Rhetoric — — Dictionaries.

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HENRY PEACHAM THE GARDEN OF ELOQUENCE PDF

Current location in this text. Enter a Perseus citation to go to another section or work. Full search options are on the right side and top of the page. Epanaphora, or Anaphora, is a forme of speech which beginneth diverse members, still with one and the same word. First in long periods.

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