JANET ABBATE INVENTING THE INTERNET PDF

Library Journal Small Arrow This sophisticated history is the best account so far published of the unpredictable and turbulent evolution of the Internet. With its broad international context, the book will be of value to makers and users of the global communications network, as well as to science and technology policy makers. Since the late s the Internet has grown from a single experimental network serving a dozen sites in the United States to a network of networks linking millions of computers worldwide. In Inventing the Internet, Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internets design and use. The story she unfolds is an often twisting tale of collaboration and conflict among a remarkable variety of players, including government and military agencies, computer scientists in academia and industry, graduate students, telecommunications companies, standards organizations, and network users. It ends with the emergence of the Internet and its rapid and seemingly chaotic growth.

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Shelves: other-non-fiction So, where did the internet come from? As I type this on my laptop on my couch, the question seems almost absurd -- like where does electricity come from. So , Abbate covers a lot of ground in pages, from the very early days of the computer networking, to evolution of the world-wide web. What she does best is to make it possible to see the world prospectively -- to see it before we know who wins.

She does a great job of talking about So, where did the internet come from? She recounts the kicking and screaming with which many of the greats of computer science were forced to join ARPAnet, and gives them a fair hearing. She reminds us that we built the internet largely to build the internet, and many of the initial reasons proved useless and unexpected reasons were why it is so useful to us today.

This ability to help understand history is remarkable, and a rare gift for a writer-- far too much history is really hagiography. She tells a good story. In contrast, her analysis of why some things happened to win is sometimes superficial, and her general observations are not that extensive.

So, she sums up: "The Internet community evolved several principles for reducing chaos and conflicts of interest in a decentralized and heterogeneous system. These included having multiple competing service providers wherever feasible; designing the system to maximize the number of operational decisions that could be made at the local level; and, in cases such as protocol standards where it is necessary to have a single decision-making group, having that group be inclusive and democratic.

Abbate has a deep faith in the power of decentralized groups of smart people working in good faith, and that is a faith I wish more people had. But the preceding paragraph is a verbatim quote of the vast majority of the high-level analysis of the book.

If you want a book of "lessons from the Internet", rather than a news-like account of the growth of it, this is not the book for you. But if you want to know the story and sort out some lessons for yourself, this is a fine read.

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Inventing the Internet

Since the late s the Internet has grown from a single experimental network serving a dozen sites in the United States to a network of networks linking millions of computers worldwide. In Inventing the Internet, Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internets design and use. The story she unfolds is an often twisting tale of collaboration and conflict among a remarkable variety of players, including government and military agencies, computer scientists in academia and industry, graduate students, telecommunications companies, standards organizations, and network users. It ends with the emergence of the Internet and its rapid and seemingly chaotic growth. Abbate looks at how academic and military influences and attitudes shaped both networks; how the usual lines between producer and user of a technology were crossed with interesting and unique results; and how later users invented their own very successful applications, such as electronic mail and the World Wide Web.

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Janet Abbate

Shelves: other-non-fiction So, where did the internet come from? As I type this on my laptop on my couch, the question seems almost absurd -- like where does electricity come from. So , Abbate covers a lot of ground in pages, from the very early days of the computer networking, to evolution of the world-wide web. What she does best is to make it possible to see the world prospectively -- to see it before we know who wins. She does a great job of talking about So, where did the internet come from? She recounts the kicking and screaming with which many of the greats of computer science were forced to join ARPAnet, and gives them a fair hearing. She reminds us that we built the internet largely to build the internet, and many of the initial reasons proved useless and unexpected reasons were why it is so useful to us today.

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Inventing the Internet

Abbate explains the efforts of several organizations that went into developing international standards that were necessary for the Internet to become as successful as it has abnate. Janet Abbate — Wikipedia Tawfiqam rated it it was amazing Jan 01, A history, of infrastructure and of people. Canadian Journal of Communications. Computers, Information, and Society. No trivia or quizzes yet. Inventing the Internet Inside Technology. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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